Finances and need for planning for young people or “millennials”

For many, when they hear the term millennial, they conjure up the image of an underemployed, tech-savvy twenty-something living in his parents’ basement. Many unfavorable stereotypes have been given to them, such as: entitled, lazy, and delusional.
In fact, millennials face many more financial challenges than previous generations. The average student loan debt of a 2012 college graduate is $29,400, while finding a decent paying job is difficult at best.
Just because you do not have great wealth, that does not mean you do not need sound financial planning and advice. No matter what your resources are, good financial planning and education are essential to long-term financial stability.
Unfortunately, millennials have not gotten this message. A study in the June issue of Kiplinger’s Finance Magazine found that only 40% of millennials have a retirement account and only 25% are willing to take investment risks in setting up a savings account. Many lack fundamental financial literacy, with little understanding of basic concepts like mortgage financing or inflation. More than 50% of millennials have used costly services, such as payday advances and pawnshops to obtain loans.
The good news is that there are many apps and online services available to help users plan and budget.
Spending and budgets: The Mint app tracks a user’s spending and income and provides an up-to-date snapshot of their current finances. There are also many budgeting websites, such as www.LearnVest.com and www.Mvelopes.com, which categorize expenditures and set target spending limits.
Saving and banking: There are apps available to help users save money and avoid ATM fees. SavedPlus.com, for example, automatically sweeps money from your checking account into your savings account every time you make a purchase. The MasterCard Nearby app allows you to search for nearby ATMs and filter your search based on criteria such as fees and 24-hr availability.
While there are many online resources available, none we found are comprehensive, and none actually provide the needed planning advice. Meeting with a trusted financial planner is always recommended.
As you read this, did think of your friends, your children, or your children’s friends, that is, does this apply to them? We hope to be addressing this with a dedicated site so all feedback is welcome.

Massachusetts enacts the Massachusetts Uniform Probate Code (“MUPC”) Many other states have or will do the same

(While the following applies to Massachusetts, there are many other states that have recently made the same changes)
Massachusetts adopted the “MUPC” on March 31, 2012. It affects almost every aspect of the law of wills and the administration of estates including changes outlined below:
• Personal Representative: The law does away with classifications of executors, temporary executors, administrators, special administrators and the like by adopting the one-size-fits-all title of “personal representative.” The personal representative acts for people with a will (“testate”) or people without (“intestate”).
• Descendants: Any portion of the estate which passes to the decedent’s descendants will pass under a new system of distribution called “per capita at each generation.” Under this rule, living children inherit equally. If a child pre-deceases the parents, and has living children, the shares of all deceased children are combined and divided equally among all the surviving children.
• Effect of Divorce on the Estate Plan: The impact of divorce is broadened from partially revoking wills and unfunded revocable trusts to expressly apply to non-probate transfers, such as life insurance policies and trusts, whether funded or unfunded, in the case where an individual has the sole power to make certain changes to at the time of the divorce or annulment. The new law also operates to revoke bequests to relatives of the ex-spouse, as well as appointments of such relatives of executor or trustee under certain situations.
• Effect of Marriage on Will: Where marriage used to automatically revokes a prior will, the MUPC does not provide for such automatic revocation. Instead, the will survives, and any legacy to descendants of the decedent (who are not descendants of the new spouse) is preserved. If any part of the estate is left to persons other than such descendants, the new spouse would receive his or her intestate share under law, to be satisfied from the assets left to such other persons (and from any bequests made to the surviving spouse, if any, in the premarital will). The testator’s choice of personal representative and guardian of minor children is also preserved. Note that this rule can be avoided by updating the will after marriage.
Because of these changes to the MUPC, it is important that your estate planning documents are up to date. If you have not updated your estate plan recently, be sure to do so as soon as possible.