Don’t just Speak to Your Parents, Do your own Planning

As young people, a.k.a. “Millennials,” graduate, become employed, start businesses and have families, their finances change. With increasing complexity come many options they must evaluate, as well as new responsibilities. Millennials are more educated that prior generations, but they are also saddled with greater student loan debt than any prior generation. And, despite their higher level of education, they get low marks for financial literacy according to a recent U.S. Treasury Department and Department of Education assessment.

What are they doing about their finances? Sources like Pew Research Center tell us that many Millennials seek advice from their parents. Unlike Boomers who did not want to speak to their parents, Millennials often share interests with their parents and correspondingly seek their counsel.

However, taking financial advice from their parents may not a good approach because many of their parents lack sufficient savings to fund their retirement needs. Mark Grimaldi, co-author of “The Money Compass: Where Your Money Went and How to Get It Back” says “never take advice from someone less successful than you are.” He continues: “With almost 30 years investment experience, I can say with complete confidence that many baby boomers, the parents of Gen Yers, are in a financial mess.”

What, then, should Millennials do then? Talking to their parents is not inherently bad, so long as that is not their sole source. “Of course, there’s a difference between receiving [parental] advice and relying solely on the advice given,” says Kristen Robinson, senior vice president of Fidelity Investments’ women and young investors’ products. “Gen Y should listen to what parents have to say. But at the end of the day, financial decisions are personal matters and best made after carefully considering a number of factors and doing research.” From Millennials: Stop Taking Financial Advice From Mom and Dad. She concludes that Millennials really need to do is find ethical professionals for help.

So, how do they do this? They search the internet of things, of course! But, wait, is that how to find truly ethical professionals? Yes, if you search with care.

Look for:
Credentials – check out their bio, are they CFP, JD, or CPA? these help validate the advisor;
Content – are they providing original advice that is sound, helpful?
Website design – professional, kept up-to-date?
Clients – who is using them for advice?;
References – who is willing to put their own reputation at stake for this website?;
Community – who are their partners and advisors?;
 followers, fans, subscribers and user testimonials – more validation;
Website design – professional, kept up-to-date?
Avoid:

Tacky websites that don’t pass the “smell test” – if it “smells bad,” then it probably is;
Old content and closed comments;
Too many ads and pop up ads directing you to buy life insurance, etc.; and
No links to anyone you have ever heard of.

For example, companies like LearnVest and Workable Wealth provide general advice to educate before you pay. Workable Wealth has stated in blog posts the hope that educating will lessen the stress of handling your finances.

Investment advice on saving for retirement – now!

Start your investment plan – now! Your future portfolio will thank you

“There’s no time like the present”, especially when it comes to investing. Young adults have a great advantage over other investors: time.

Compounding – The benefit of time is that is allows for interest to compound, which is the ability of an investment to grow by reinvesting earnings. Consider that a single $10,000 investment at age 20 would grow to over $70,000 by the time the investor becomes 60 years old (based on a 5% interest rate). By comparison, the same investment made at age 30 would yield about $43,000 by age 60, and made at age 40 would yield only $26,000. The longer money is put to work, the more wealth it can generate in the future.

Matches – If your employer offers an employer-sponsored retirement plan, like a 401(k), we suggest you enroll in their plan. Not only is savings made easy through automatic payroll deductions, but your contributions are made with pre-tax dollars. Additionally, many employers offer 401(k) matches, which means they will contribute money into your account. If you don’t take advantage of this benefit, then you are leaving money on the table.

Resources – Another advantage young people have is there are now, more than ever, many low-cost services available to make saving and investing easy.

  • Consider the Acorns app. This app rounds up each transaction you make with your debit or credit card to the nearest dollar and invests the change into a diversified portfolio.
  • Robinhood is another useful resource. This app offers commission-free trading of listed stocks and ETFs. They run a lean company which allows them to operate for less. They make their money by accruing interested on investors uninvested cash balances and through fees charged in their upgraded version. This is a low-cost means of entering the investment world.
  • Check out Betterment.com, a robo-planner website for investing using ETFs that holds down fees. You use this to invest your taxable funds and your retirement plans, like IRAs.
  • Also check out earthfolio.com, a robo-planner for investing “with a social conscience.”

Whichever form of investment you decide to take, the earlier you begin, the better. Start building your wealth now! See also: Young people, don’t let this happen to you. Plan for retirement now!

 

[As we have stated in past posts, we recommend investing passively, using ETFs or index funds, so you save fees. You can buy a diverse set of ETFs, set up your portfolio and sleep until you rebalance next year.]

Steve Jobs said: “Stay Hungry. Stay Foolish” – so how does that help your career path?

Michael Simmons recalled the impact of Steve Jobs last January in Top predictor of career success 2015.

Simmons then says: “We think we understand what caused his success. We don’t. We dismiss usable principles of success by labeling them as personality quirks. What’s often missed is the paradoxical interplay of two of his seemingly opposite qualities; maniacal focus and insatiable curiosity. These weren’t just two random strengths. They may have been his most important as they helped lead to everything else … Jobs’ curiosity fueled his passion and provided him with access to unique insights, skills, values, and world-class people who complemented his own skill set. Jobs’ focus brought those to bear in the world of personal electronics.”

In the post, he quotes Steve Jobs form 1995: “Creativity is just connecting things. When you ask creative people how they did something, they feel a little guilty because they didn’t really do it, they just saw something.”

How does any of this relate to you and your career? Simmons reports from his 2013 interview of an expert on networks that a key indicator is being in “open networks.” He then indicates how that is beneficial:

• More accurate view of the world. It provides them with the ability to pull information from diverse clusters so errors cancel themselves out. Research by Philip Tetlock shows that people with open networks are better forecasters than people with closed networks.

• Ability to control the timing of information sharing. While they may not be the first to hear information, they can be the first to introduce information to another cluster. As a result, they can leverage the first move advantage.

• Ability to serve as a translator / connector between groups. They can create value by serving as an intermediary and connecting two people or organizations who can help each other who wouldn’t normally run into each other.

 • More breakthrough ideas. Brian Uzzi, professor of leadership and organizational change at the Kellogg School of Management, performed a landmark study where he delved into the tens of millions of academic studies throughout history. He compared their results by the number of citations (links from other research papers) they received and the other papers they referenced. A fascinating pattern emerged. The top performing studies had references that were 90% conventional and 10% atypical (i.e., pulling from other fields). This rule has held constant over time and across fields. People with open networks are more easily able to create atypical combinations.

Here is a quote that I find interesting (and can relate to):

This is challenging in that it can lead to feeling like an outsider as a result of being misunderstood and under-appreciated because few people understand why you think the way you do. It is also challenging, because it requires assimilating different and conflicting perspectives into one worldview.

And this really does ultimately get back to Steve Jobs, who said “Stay Hungry. Stay Foolish” If you have not read, or better yet, watched this, find time to do so: The 2005 Stanford commencement address Jobs – “Stay Hungry. Stay Foolish.”

Michael Simmons is a bestselling author and the co-founder of Empact, a global entrepreneurship education organization that has held 500+ entrepreneurship events including Summits at the White House, US Chamber of Commerce, and United Nations.

What we are reading – for laughs, for serious thought and discussion, and just because

She’s right: This is the Fourth Grader who Asked Obama to put a Woman on the $20 Bill, from BuzzFeed News

Technology: Musk Plots Energy Storage fix Where Utility Industry Failed, from Bloomberg

Humor: Cookie Monster, Life Coach – on YouTube

Health: A 2-Minute Walk May Counter the Harms of Sitting – Even a few minutes per hour of moving instead of remaining in a chair might substantially reduce the risk of premature death.

Language: 20 Common Phrases Even the Smartest People Misuse, from The Muse

Comedy: Penn Jillette’s Big Dumb American Crush on Howard Johnson’s, from Eater

How to Be Emotionally Intelligent – What makes a leader? Knowledge, smarts and vision, but also the ability to identify and monitor emotions and manage relationships. From the NY Times

Comedy: The Man Who Makes the World’s Funniest People Even Funnier. As comedies become increasingly improvisational, they need an editor like Brent White to sew them together. From the NY Times- Quote: “Sometimes you just create a joke out of nothing.”

How Music Hijacks Our Perception of Time, from Nautilus – Quote: “The Royal Automobile Club deemed Wagner’s Ride of the Valkyrie the most dangerous music to listen to while driving.”

What Is Your Purpose? We need to forge new ways to seriously discuss the deepest questions in life with modern tools. This is a start. From the NY Times