Finances and need for planning for young people or “millennials”

For many, when they hear the term millennial, they conjure up the image of an underemployed, tech-savvy twenty-something living in his parents’ basement. Many unfavorable stereotypes have been given to them, such as: entitled, lazy, and delusional.
In fact, millennials face many more financial challenges than previous generations. The average student loan debt of a 2012 college graduate is $29,400, while finding a decent paying job is difficult at best.
Just because you do not have great wealth, that does not mean you do not need sound financial planning and advice. No matter what your resources are, good financial planning and education are essential to long-term financial stability.
Unfortunately, millennials have not gotten this message. A study in the June issue of Kiplinger’s Finance Magazine found that only 40% of millennials have a retirement account and only 25% are willing to take investment risks in setting up a savings account. Many lack fundamental financial literacy, with little understanding of basic concepts like mortgage financing or inflation. More than 50% of millennials have used costly services, such as payday advances and pawnshops to obtain loans.
The good news is that there are many apps and online services available to help users plan and budget.
Spending and budgets: The Mint app tracks a user’s spending and income and provides an up-to-date snapshot of their current finances. There are also many budgeting websites, such as www.LearnVest.com and www.Mvelopes.com, which categorize expenditures and set target spending limits.
Saving and banking: There are apps available to help users save money and avoid ATM fees. SavedPlus.com, for example, automatically sweeps money from your checking account into your savings account every time you make a purchase. The MasterCard Nearby app allows you to search for nearby ATMs and filter your search based on criteria such as fees and 24-hr availability.
While there are many online resources available, none we found are comprehensive, and none actually provide the needed planning advice. Meeting with a trusted financial planner is always recommended.
As you read this, did think of your friends, your children, or your children’s friends, that is, does this apply to them? We hope to be addressing this with a dedicated site so all feedback is welcome.

Tax Law Changes Coming, including raised capital gains and dividend tax rates

This month, President Obama released his proposed FY 2014 budget which contains new taxes, limits on deductions, and other changes intended to meet the goal of raising more than $580 billion in revenue.
The most significant of these is the termination of capital gains breaks and qualified dividend treatment, causing them both to be taxed as ordinary income. The Kiplinger Tax Letter suggests taking capital gains before 2015 to lock in the lower rate. However, as always, do not let a tax strategy override a good investment plan.
Here is a summary of other changes that may affect you:
The 28% Limitation:
• Affects married taxpayers filing jointly with income over $250,000 and single taxpayers with income over $200,000.
• Limits the tax rate at which these taxpayers can reduce their tax liability to a maximum of 28%.
• Applies to all itemized deduction including charitable contributions, mortgage interest, employer provided health insurance, interest income on state and local bonds, foreign excluded income, tax-exempt interest, retirement contributions and certain above-the-line deductions.
The “Buffet Rule”
• Households with income over $1 million pay at least 30% of their income (after charitable donations) in tax.
• Implements a “Fair Share Tax,” which would equal 30% of the taxpayer’s adjusted gross income, less a charitable donation credit equal to 28% of itemized charitable contributions allowed after the overall limitation on itemized deductions. The Fair Share Tax would be phased in, starting at adjusted gross incomes of $1 million, and would be fully phased in at adjusted gross incomes of $2 million.
Estate, gift, and generation-skipping transfer (GST) Tax
• Reintroduce rules that were in effect in 2009, except that portability of the estate tax exclusion between spouses would be retained.
• This change would take effect in 2018.
• Top tax rate would be 45% and the exclusion amount would be $3.5 million for estate and GST taxes, and $1 million for gift taxes.
The Kiplinger Tax Letter anticipates the changes being acted on as early as 2014. On April 23, 2013, Max Baucus (D-MT), the head of the Senate Finance Committee, announced he would retire from the U.S. Senate at the end of his term in 2015. In The Kiplinger Tax Latter, Vol. 88, No. 9, Kiplinger predicts that “he’ll push to make revamping the tax code his legacy.”
You may feel as though you are done with taxes and do not need address them for another year. Resist that urge and schedule a meeting with us so we can review the potential impact of proposed tax changes on your portfolio and investments. We can also discuss the best strategies for saving money on your 2013 and 2014 tax returns.

The news may be too much, but there are financial matters to review, if you just set aside time

Many people react to the bombardment of news on the economy, the European debt issues, the presidential campaign and legislative gridlock by wanting to shut it all off! That is understandable, but not often the best solution

It is one matter to just not open investment statements; it is a wholly different matter to postpone addressing financial issues

So, while you may not want to review re-balancing of your investments to match your long-term allocation or hear about the dismal returns on bonds, there is more that you can still address

We have suggested a list at: finance health day your own financial planning focus

It is like a “mental health day” but for your personal finances.
After you look at the list, let me know what you think, what you decide to do,
and if we can help you or anyone you know accomplish what is needed now. Thank you,

Steven

Web-Based Financial Planning Tools for College Students and others

In advising a senior going to study abroad, I learned that he did not know how to obtain his own credit card, how to set up banking before and during his trip and how to manage the entire process. This was a surprise, as some many web sites seem loaded with information.

However, the bank sites tell you some but not all of what you need to do. Similarly, college sites may mention ATMs without connecting to Handbooks may suggest Parents may have no clear understanding of

No single place gives you a complete road map, let alone telling you how to connect all the resources to get your answer, so you have to turn the web into your own tools.

The first step is contacting the overseas college for local banks, currency exchanges and connecting to close by ATMs and banks. The next step is getting your own credit card or a additional cars on your parent’s account. Then you get to finding a US bank into which your parents can deposit or from which they can wire so you have funds in you bank at college.

The key is to link all the information that is on the web to create a plan for your study abroad, using the web sites to answer and obtain all you need

Investment Strategies and short-term turmoil: sometimes it is better not to watch!

Maybe the last few days of investment market turmoil need to be put in the same category along with legislation and sausage – that you don’t to watch while it’s being made….

You investments will ultimately provide returns, but you probably did not need to watch as the stock markets slid last Thursday and again Friday, bounced around Monday and then shot back up on Tuesday

It may have been confusing or even scary. However, as you always hear us say, the key is sticking to your investment allocation and long-term strategy… that is what works over time.

Here is an interesting example of why investment allocation is so important.

* On Monday, many investments were down, but not all. There are funds we use that were up significantly on that day.

* The same funds were also up on Tuesday

In contrast, if you panicked and sold some time on Friday to sit in cash or gold, you missed the upswing of the last few days. Staying invested worked better than any timing attempts.

Therefore, diversification by asset class, and staying with your strategy, can provide positive results even in times of turmoil.

Let me know if you have questions or comments …. and good luck!