2017 year-end tax planning – a year of uncertainty

President Trump and the Republicans Congress are working to pass a new tax law. However, not all details are known. Furthermore, the current House and Senate bills differ on many significant provisions. Also, more revisions are expected as the two bills are reconciled and brought to the floor for votes. Finally, the Republicans failed to repeal the Affordable Care Act, so many provisions could change, if any changes are ever enacted.

With all the uncertainty, how do you plan? Very carefully – you need to augment your traditional year-end planning by anticipating likely changes.

Practical planning steps

First, be practical:

  • Determine what income and deductions you can move from 2017 to 2018 or vice versa.

Second, review the impact:

  • What happens if you shift any of these amounts of income and deductions to the other year?

Finally, watch for the impact of the Alternative Minimum Tax (“AMT”):

  • If the AMT is repealed next year, how does that change your analysis? Deductions lost to the AMT this year could have value in 2018.

Income

Both the House and Senate bills lower the tax brackets, so income should be subject to less tax in 2018. Furthermore, if the Medicare tax is eliminated, pushing income into 2018 could save significantly.

Conclusion: You probably want to move income to next year if you can.

One possible exception is the sale of your home: both bills move the residency requirement from two of the last five years to five of the last eight years. So, if you are selling to sell a home you lived in less than five years, try to close in 2017.

Exemptions and standard deduction

Both bills raise the standard deductions to $12,000 single/$24,000 married. This may offset deductions that you lose, as discussed below.

Conclusion: You probably want to move deductions to 2017.

Itemized Deductions and Credits

The deduction for state income taxes would be eliminated and deduction of property taxes either eliminated or capped at $10,000 (the current amount).

Mortgage interest on new home purchases would be deductible only on loans of up to $500,000 on the primary residence only.

And these deductions could be eliminated: student loan interest, moving expenses, tax preparation fees, casualty losses, medical expenses. Also, the deduction of alimony could be eliminated for divorces occurring after 2017 and electric car credits and bike to work exclusions could end.

Conclusion: If these deductions are capped or eliminated, you will want to move these amounts into 2017.

Pass-through businesses

Income from an LLC, partnership or S Corporation could see a top tax rate of 17.4 to 25%. However, to avoid abuse (as seen with a similar law in Kansas), rules would be applied so that taxpayers will not simply create entities to have all of their income tax at the lower rate.

Conclusion: wait and see, read the fine print, then see if there are any opportunities to exploit.

Estate taxes

Either the tax on estates would be eliminated or the credit doubled.

Conclusion: you may want to postpone your year-end gift planning.

 

Summary

Carefully review any income and deductions that you can still affect to see if moving will lessen the total taxes you pay for 2017 and 2018.

Good luck and best wishes for the holidays!

If you have any questions, please contact me.

Tax Law change under the new Trump Administration? Maybe, but too soon for planning

Enacting Major Changes Will Take Time

President Trump made tax reform a key issue in his campaign. He is now president and Republicans are in charge of the House and Senate, so the likelihood of overhauling the federal tax system is better than they have been for decades.

However, President Trump and Congress are trying to enact changes to the Affordable Care Act as well as addressing budget issues and foreign relations. Also, dealing with all the recent hearings involving the FBI have diverted attention. Finally, there are many details that need to be worked out, making it unlikely that major changes will happen until 2018.

Change in IRS Regulations

President Trump has already made changes in IRS regulations. On his first day in office, he temporarily froze tax regulations and then shortly thereafter, ordered that two existing regulations had to be removed for each one that was added. What is the impact?

  • The Trump administration has stated that the two-for-one exchange rule only applies to significant regulatory actions. The rule may not affect the many IRS regulations that are procedural in nature or are needed by taxpayers.
  • One new regulation that has been threatened is the Department of Labor’s new fiduciary rules for retirement advisers. This updated regulation requires retirement advisers to act in their clients’ best interests, which is a stricter standard than was previously required.
  • Also affected are the new partnership audit procedure. A 2015 law streamlined the exam process of large partnerships. The IRS released proposed regulations which implemented the regime on January 18. However, it later pulled the regulations in response to the freeze.

Possible Tax Law Changes – Lower Corporate Tax Rate

Currently, the corporate tax rate tops out at 35%. House Republicans want to lower it to 20% with 25% for businesses that pass income through their owners and for those that are self-employed. President Trump is calling for a 15% corporate tax. In 2014, nearly 25 million Americans filed taxes as sole proprietors (Schedule C), so the change affects many taxpayers.

Tax strategy: Under this change, individuals who are high-earning could become independent contractors or set up LLCs to shift income and advantage of the lower corporate tax rate. Additionally, those who own pass-through businesses could reduce their salaries and take higher profits.

This is how residents of Kansas responded to a similar state law. The state is now working to repeal a law passed in 2012 that exempted pass-through firms from state income tax. The result was that many individuals and businesses in the state restructured their business as pass-through entities or created new businesses to take advantage of the tax break. In just a few years, the number of pass-throughs in the state almost doubled. The state is now facing a large budget deficit as a result because the pass-through exemption is estimated to have cost the state $472 million in 2014 alone. The cost for 2015 was even higher.

The impact of this tax strategy on the 15% tax at the federal level would be expensive. It is estimated to cost up to $1.95 trillion in lost tax revenues over the next ten years. The Trump administration is considering ways to prevent abuse of this low tax rate but any attempt to prevent gaming the system will likely add more complexity to the tax code. Tax-savvy practitioners will likely still be able to find loopholes.

Tax only on Income Earned inside the US

Worldwide income is taxed presently, with credits for foreign taxes paid. The proposed law would generally tax only income that is earned within U.S.

Multinational Tax: A new, low tax on multinationals is part of the proposed tax, added to raise revenue to fund other rate reductions.

Estate Tax Repeal

Republicans would like to repeal the estate tax. President Trump would impose a tax on pre-death appreciation of assets, with a $10 million per couple exemption. There would be no step up in basis at death. And it is likely that gift tax rules would be retained.

Even if the federal estate tax law is repealed, many states will continue to impost a tax. Massachusetts only exempts $1 million of assets passing to someone other than a spouse, such as a trust. New York and other states have higher exemptions. Thus, planning is still important for most people.

Planning Opportunities

With the uncertainty of any change being enacted, this is not an easy year for planning. For example, this may not be the year for a Roth conversion, if tax rates will go down next year. It may not be the time for complex estate planning techniques involving irrevocable transfers, if the estate tax is eliminated in 2018.

We will keep monitoring this to assess any moves that do make sense and update this post when the likelihood of real changes becomes clear.

Plan now to avoid surprises from the Affordable Care Act when filing 2014 taxes

2014 was the first year Americans had access to health insurance options through the Affordable Care Act (the “ACA”). With this new access to insurance came the obligation to purchase it or face new tax consequences. If you opted not to buy health insurance in 2014, you may be faced with a penalty when you file your 2014 tax returns. Even if you did buy insurance through one of the insurance marketplaces, you may have new tax forms to complete and some surprises when it comes to your refund or tax bill.

For most taxpayers, the impact on their tax filing will be minimal, requiring those who were covered to simply check a box indicating they had insurance throughout the year. Those who received subsidies to purchase insurance and who later had increases in their 2014 salary may be required to pay back some of that subsidy. Those whose salary decreased may receive a larger than expected refund.

As these provisions are new to everyone, there may be confusion for taxpayers and tax preparers alike. Unfortunately, due to recent budget cuts, the IRS expects to be able to speak with only half of the people who call in for assistance.

While gearing up for the 2014 tax season, it’s helpful to understand some the most important provisions of the ACA:

  • 1. Exemptions: The ACA provided some exemptions that allow taxpayers to opt out of purchasing insurance without any penalties, including hardship, affordability and religion. There are different methods for applying for an exemption depending on the type of exemption you are requesting. To learn more, go to: https://www.healthcare.gov/fees-exemptions/apply-for-exemption/
  • 2. Penalties: Those who do not qualify for an exemption, were insured for only part of the year, or remain uninsured will be required to pay a penalty called “The Individual Shared Responsibility Payment.” The penalty is set to increase over the coming years, so compare not to see if it is more beneficial for you to pay the penalty or buy insurance. The Tax Policy Center has designed a calculator to help you determine your penalty is you opt to remain uninsured: http://taxpolicycenter.org/taxfacts/acacalculator.cfm.
  • 3. Reconciling: Those who purchased subsidized insurance on the exchanges received an advance on a tax credit. At the time of requesting the subsidy for insurance in 2014, the amount of the subsidy was calculated based on the taxpayer’s 2012 income. The amount of the subsidy granted will be reconciled in the taxpayer’s 2014 filing using the taxpayer’s actual 2014 income and that will affect the taxpayer’s refund or bill. Changes in an individual’s personal circumstances, such as divorce, marriage or a new child can also impact those numbers.
  • There’s still time to plan. Taxpayers facing a loss in premium subsidies because of an increase in income can reduce their income to qualify for the credits. For example, they can contribute to an IRA by April 15, 2015, for the 2014 tax year.

    Update on estate planning – what should you gift now?

    Estate planning remains stuck in limbo. That is, after 2012, the $5 million credit for gift and estate taxes goes away and we could be back at a $1 million credit. Also, the generation skipping tax limit now at $5 million would decrease. Finally, the portability of estate tax exemptions between spouses expires, meaning that the survivor can no longer use any credit amount not used by the first spouse, which would allow more to pass on estate tax free.
    So far, Congress has taken no action. Many expect the 35% rate and a credit of at least $3 million to be the law for 2013 on. However, Congress failed to fix the estate tax for 2010 so nothing is certain.

    Planning: This means you need to review your estate plan, especially your gifting strategies, and act now to take advantage of the higher gift tax credit. You can gift up to $5 million of assets free of gift tax now, or $10 million for married couples. The benefit is that all future income and appreciation on these gifts is removed from your estate. The downside is that the gifts are irrevocable, so you must be certain that what you pass on now you will not need later.
    You always want to select assets that you expect will grow in value. If the assets decline, the strategy is frustrated. An example of what could go wrong is gift of a home at peak values that is now worth far less.

    Remember that you have the annual gift tax exclusion allowing you and your spouse can each give $13,000 per year to any individual without eating away at your gift and estate tax credit. And note: any payments made to colleges or hospitals for the benefit of another person are not counted at all. (No gift tax return is required for these excluded amounts.)

    How do you effectively structure the gift? Here are some examples:
    • Family limited liability company (FLLC): With real estate or business assets, you can transfer minority interests in the FLLC to children or grandchildren. You retain control and the amount you gift is discounted because the minority interests lack control and lack marketability. You will need an appraisal for the value and the discount.
    • Dynasty trust: This type of trust is designed to pass assets on multiple generations. Distributions can be made to the first generations, but they never actually receive a final amount – they rely on the trustee for any amounts to be distributed to them.
    • Grantor retained annuity trust (GRAT): This trust transfers assets to children after a specified term while retaining a fixed annuity. The amount you gift is discounted, because children do not receive it until the end of the term. If the amount transfers, you succeed in transferring a discounted amount that becomes worth much more to the next generation.
    • Qualified Personal Residence Trust (QPRT) Like the GRAT, your children receive your house in the future, so the value of the gift made now is discounted. You can even stay in the house after that term, but you have to pay rent, which is in effect another gift.

    One note of caution: some have expressed the concern that if Congress does not act, the IRS could try to take back the excess in some fashion. Be sure to consult with your estate tax advisor before taking any moves.
    We added gifting as a “to do” on the Finance Health Day page .

    Tax planning and 2011 estate tax law

    While we await more details, recent action by Congress has the Bush tax cuts continuing for two more years, making the 2010 to 2011 tax planning straight forward – much like past years.

    The new law provides relief on the AMT, no reduction in deductions and other benefits, which we plan to review in greater detail.

    Also, it appears that, rather than return to a $1 million unified credit for estate taxes, at least a $3.5 million, if not a $5 million, credit and perhaps as low as a 35% tax rate will be the law next year.

    Until we have more, please consider this summary of Tax planning: 2010 tips and traps, and 2011 changes

    For 2010, some old provisions return and some new changes require action now:

    2010 conversion to a Roth IRA has no income limit and two years to pay the taxes (please see to convert or not to convert).

    Certain advantages in 2009 are lost for 2010 (see tax planning 2009 tips and traps and 2010 changes):
    • AMT patch falls back;
    • Casualty and theft loss limits fall back;
    • Educator and tuition and fees deductions against adjusted gross income are not available;
    • Deduction of state and local sales taxes ends;
    • Exclusion of $2,400 of unemployment income ends; and
    • Exclusion of income from qualified distributions from IRAs to charities ends.

    However, some still apply in 2010:
    • New home buyer credit (through the extended date)
    • Energy Credit for solar power, fuel cells and certain energy efficient improvements are Schedule A deductions. There are two types of credit depending on what improvements were made to your home and taking the deductions requires you to have documentation.
    • A tax refund can be used to buy U.S. Series I bonds.
    • Note that a dependent child’s income is taxed when it exceeds $1,900.
    • Educator’s Expense

    Note that not all states accept the IRS changes, so the information and outcome could be different.

    As we said before, tax planning involves a multi-year view to optimize what you end up paying.

    You should also review your mortgage when you review tax information.