2017 year-end tax planning – a year of uncertainty

President Trump and the Republicans Congress are working to pass a new tax law. However, not all details are known. Furthermore, the current House and Senate bills differ on many significant provisions. Also, more revisions are expected as the two bills are reconciled and brought to the floor for votes. Finally, the Republicans failed to repeal the Affordable Care Act, so many provisions could change, if any changes are ever enacted.

With all the uncertainty, how do you plan? Very carefully – you need to augment your traditional year-end planning by anticipating likely changes.

Practical planning steps

First, be practical:

  • Determine what income and deductions you can move from 2017 to 2018 or vice versa.

Second, review the impact:

  • What happens if you shift any of these amounts of income and deductions to the other year?

Finally, watch for the impact of the Alternative Minimum Tax (“AMT”):

  • If the AMT is repealed next year, how does that change your analysis? Deductions lost to the AMT this year could have value in 2018.

Income

Both the House and Senate bills lower the tax brackets, so income should be subject to less tax in 2018. Furthermore, if the Medicare tax is eliminated, pushing income into 2018 could save significantly.

Conclusion: You probably want to move income to next year if you can.

One possible exception is the sale of your home: both bills move the residency requirement from two of the last five years to five of the last eight years. So, if you are selling to sell a home you lived in less than five years, try to close in 2017.

Exemptions and standard deduction

Both bills raise the standard deductions to $12,000 single/$24,000 married. This may offset deductions that you lose, as discussed below.

Conclusion: You probably want to move deductions to 2017.

Itemized Deductions and Credits

The deduction for state income taxes would be eliminated and deduction of property taxes either eliminated or capped at $10,000 (the current amount).

Mortgage interest on new home purchases would be deductible only on loans of up to $500,000 on the primary residence only.

And these deductions could be eliminated: student loan interest, moving expenses, tax preparation fees, casualty losses, medical expenses. Also, the deduction of alimony could be eliminated for divorces occurring after 2017 and electric car credits and bike to work exclusions could end.

Conclusion: If these deductions are capped or eliminated, you will want to move these amounts into 2017.

Pass-through businesses

Income from an LLC, partnership or S Corporation could see a top tax rate of 17.4 to 25%. However, to avoid abuse (as seen with a similar law in Kansas), rules would be applied so that taxpayers will not simply create entities to have all of their income tax at the lower rate.

Conclusion: wait and see, read the fine print, then see if there are any opportunities to exploit.

Estate taxes

Either the tax on estates would be eliminated or the credit doubled.

Conclusion: you may want to postpone your year-end gift planning.

 

Summary

Carefully review any income and deductions that you can still affect to see if moving will lessen the total taxes you pay for 2017 and 2018.

Good luck and best wishes for the holidays!

If you have any questions, please contact me.

Plan now to avoid surprises from the Affordable Care Act when filing 2014 taxes

2014 was the first year Americans had access to health insurance options through the Affordable Care Act (the “ACA”). With this new access to insurance came the obligation to purchase it or face new tax consequences. If you opted not to buy health insurance in 2014, you may be faced with a penalty when you file your 2014 tax returns. Even if you did buy insurance through one of the insurance marketplaces, you may have new tax forms to complete and some surprises when it comes to your refund or tax bill.

For most taxpayers, the impact on their tax filing will be minimal, requiring those who were covered to simply check a box indicating they had insurance throughout the year. Those who received subsidies to purchase insurance and who later had increases in their 2014 salary may be required to pay back some of that subsidy. Those whose salary decreased may receive a larger than expected refund.

As these provisions are new to everyone, there may be confusion for taxpayers and tax preparers alike. Unfortunately, due to recent budget cuts, the IRS expects to be able to speak with only half of the people who call in for assistance.

While gearing up for the 2014 tax season, it’s helpful to understand some the most important provisions of the ACA:

  • 1. Exemptions: The ACA provided some exemptions that allow taxpayers to opt out of purchasing insurance without any penalties, including hardship, affordability and religion. There are different methods for applying for an exemption depending on the type of exemption you are requesting. To learn more, go to: https://www.healthcare.gov/fees-exemptions/apply-for-exemption/
  • 2. Penalties: Those who do not qualify for an exemption, were insured for only part of the year, or remain uninsured will be required to pay a penalty called “The Individual Shared Responsibility Payment.” The penalty is set to increase over the coming years, so compare not to see if it is more beneficial for you to pay the penalty or buy insurance. The Tax Policy Center has designed a calculator to help you determine your penalty is you opt to remain uninsured: http://taxpolicycenter.org/taxfacts/acacalculator.cfm.
  • 3. Reconciling: Those who purchased subsidized insurance on the exchanges received an advance on a tax credit. At the time of requesting the subsidy for insurance in 2014, the amount of the subsidy was calculated based on the taxpayer’s 2012 income. The amount of the subsidy granted will be reconciled in the taxpayer’s 2014 filing using the taxpayer’s actual 2014 income and that will affect the taxpayer’s refund or bill. Changes in an individual’s personal circumstances, such as divorce, marriage or a new child can also impact those numbers.
  • There’s still time to plan. Taxpayers facing a loss in premium subsidies because of an increase in income can reduce their income to qualify for the credits. For example, they can contribute to an IRA by April 15, 2015, for the 2014 tax year.